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"The Beulah record label has always been one of the most idiosyncratic, and therefore perhaps most interesting, of reissue marques. While the basic character of Beulah remains the same as in its Compact Disc days, the range of its present catalogue, driven now by the ease of downloading, has been extended in remarkable fashion. Browsing the Beulah catalogue is now rather like being in a 78rpm record shop: there are plenty of recordings of short pieces available to whet your appetite for either repertoire or artist, while at the same time there are numerous full length works available if you wish to consolidate your collection with, for instance, major symphonies. All of Beulah's transfers, as might be expected of a distinguished reissue label, are of very high quality." David Patmore writing in Classical Recordings Quarterly


"I’m grateful to Beulah for turning out so many very fine transfers, with no loss of the music but none of the surface noise. LP sound without the hassle. " Brian Wilson at Music Web Inernational



Britsh Music at Beulah

 In June 1979 a small group of people (including Beulah's founder), with a passion for British music, met under the chairmanship of Peter Middleton, to discuss how such music may become better known. At that time, apart from a few favourites, very little British Music was broadcast or recorded. The meeting ended with the formation of the British Music Society.

New for July

Many music lovers miss the sound from vinyl pressings. Many others have yet to discover how pleasant the sound can be. Most of our albums are mastered from vinyl LP pressings and earlier recordings (before 1953) from 78 rpm discs. It is our ability to recreate, in the digital age, the sound from the disc era that many of our customers find most enjoyable.

Unlike modern digital recordings tracks in our albums do contain some distortion, and the occasional surface noises, but for many listeners these "defects" are soon forgotten.

Our albums are available from many download and streaming sites.

We highly recommend downloading from qobuz where you can download or stream in high quality, for the same price as iTunes medium quality.

New albums


2PS32 military marches

apple music

spotify

qobuz


1ps46 aksel achiotz schubert schunmann

apple music

spotify

qobuz


1PS47 essence of wagner

apple music

spotify

qobuz


1PS48 polish piano music

apple music

spotify

qobuz


1PS49 double and triple concertos

coming soon


1PS50 ray noble and his british and american orchestra

coming soon


Bernrad Haitink the Early Years Volume 1

coming soon


Bernrad Haitink the Early Years Volume 2

coming soon

What the Critics Say


6PD17 bruckner symphony number 8

apple music

spotify

qobuz

"...why am I even bothering to review this Beulah reissue? Firstly, because Bruckner thought the Eighth was his masterpiece, yet it was not highly regarded when I started to be interested in recordings of his music. Then it was only the Fourth that tended to receive the limelight – my first recording of that was a mid-price Vox reissue of the Klemperer VSO recording on a single LP in atrocious sound. It was not until much later that I caught up with the Eighth, from Eugen Jochum’s DG recording.

"Secondly, because Barry Coward has waved his usual magic wand over what was never the best of recordings, even by the standards of 1956; Philips were lagging well behind Decca at the time.As always, I recommend obtaining this and other Beulah recordings from Qobuz where, for the same £7.99 as from elsewhere, the downloads are available in the same quality as my lossless  previews.

"Mostly, however, I’m very pleased to welcome this reissue because van Beinum had a real knack for conducting Bruckner. Where Jochum thought in paragraphs in an attempt to make the music appeal to more listeners, Beinum thought in chapters and still made the music appeal. The chapters are long, but we never lose sight of the end. And though the effect is to sound leisurely, with the music given plenty of time to expand and breathe, it never drags. That’s also due to the quality of the orchestral playing. If you have access to the Qobuz streaming service, try the opening of the scherzo for a good idea of the quality of the direction and the playing; there’s a real sense of enjoyment almost allowed to get out of hand before a more thoughtful mood prevails.

"Overall, despite the appearance of breadth, Beinum comes in ten minutes shorter than most other recordings, though he employs the Haas edition of the original, not Bruckner’s slightly abridged revision.

" Not having heard this van Beinum recording before, I’ve now found a version of the Eighth to add to those few that go on to some purpose. It’s straightforward, with no gimmicks, but it’s not boringly straightforward. With Beulah giving this idiomatic account to us in very decent sound and at an attractive price, I see no reason to hold back. "


Brian Wilson at Musicweb International

...


1ps45 elizabethan serenade

apple music

spotify

qobuz

"No, that’s not the Ronald Binge Elizabethan Serenadebut some of Julian Bream’s ground-breaking recordings on solo lute and with his eponymous consort. Styles change and neither the solo nor the consort music would be thought authentic now, but Bream’s recordings from this period remain enjoyable and interesting. Like all his output, they have remained only fitfully available on CD, so I’m pleased to have snapped most of them up when they were available in the RCA Julian Bream Edition. Even the multi-CD box set has gone, so the Beulah release is very welcome.

"Where the Beulah selection scores over all these is in presenting the lute music alongside the consort music, alternating on the first 15 tracks, with the rest devoted to Bream alone.On the other tracks, some of the consort pieces such as Can she excuse my wrongs?are made to sound almost like jazz."

Brian Wilson at Musicweb International


apple music

spotify

qobuz

"Can recordings of Telemann from the early 1960s still sound stylish? The first three items first appeared in 1963 on the Cantate label and were joined on the super-budget Oryx label (£0.99) a decade later. Not only was that reissue excellent value –though the equivalentpricenow would be over £20 –the performances still sounded fine and they still do. Of course, there’s much more Telemann available now, with multi-CD releases from the likes of CPOalmost everyday occurrences, but I enjoyed the German Bach Soloists as much more than a blast from the past.

"The Triple Concerto, TWV53:E1, is familiar from more recent recordings, most recently from Florilegium on a Channel Classics recording which failed to appeal to Johan van Veen. He was rather more satisfied with the CPO recording on Volume 1 of their series of Telemann grand concertos for multiple instruments. You might expect direct comparison of the older recording on Beulah with the CPO to be a hands-down win for the newer version; in fact, though I liked the CPO better than my colleague, I’d find it hard to callthe scorebetween the two.In particular, the first movement is taken at a more andantepace on the older recordingwhilethe performancesthroughout the CPO are a little easy-going."

"The recording of the Hamburger Ebb’und Fluth, commonly known as his Water Music, presumably comes from a Concert Hall LP, conductor David Josefowitz’s own company. I take the Paris Baroque Orchestra to have been a scratch ensemble.

" Again, the playing is much sprightlierand more stylish than I had expected, even by comparison with Reinhard Goebel’s recording, the speed merchant toning down his impetuosity here, even in the final canarie representing the jolly boatmen. I wouldn’t recommend the Beulah as my first choice, but it can stand comparison with my favourites from the King’s Consort (Hyperion CDA66967) and the Akademie für alte Music Berlin (Harmonia Mundi HMC901917)."

Brian Wilson at Musicweb International